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New Ministers of Economy and Justice Appointed in Japan

Yoko Kamikawa became the new Minister of Justice, and Yoichi Miyazawa was appointed Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry

Emperor Akihito approved 21 October presented by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe candidacies of new ministers who will take the seats of the retired Yuko Obuchi and Midori Matsushima. As Kyodo reported, Yoko Kamikawa became the new Minister of Justice, and Yoichi Miyazawa was appointed Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry.

A member of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party of Japan (LDP), 64-year-old Yoichi Miyazawa, who served for many years in the Ministry of Finance, received a post in the country's government for the first time. He comes from a family of hereditary politicians: his uncle Kiichi Miyazawa served as Prime Minister of Japan from 1991 to 1993, and his father Hiroshi Miyazawa was Governor of Hiroshima Prefecture from 1973 to 1981, and also served as Minister of Justice from 1995-1996 years. The Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry plays a key role in the question of the resumption of the work of Japanese nuclear power plants, which were shut down after the accident at Fukushima-1 in the spring of 2011, but Yoichi Miyazawa has not yet indicated his position on this issue.

61-year-old Yoko Kamikawa, also a LDP deputy, has already held the post of state minister for gender equality in 2007. Prior to that, she worked at the Mitsubishi Research Institute and graduated from Harvard University in the United States.

On Monday, two members of the Japanese government, Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry Yuko Obuchi and Minister of Justice Midori Matsushima, resigned in connection with accusations of bribery of voters. The departure of two important ministers from their posts dealt a powerful blow to the government headed by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. Experts fear that this could lead to a "domino effect" and lead to new financial scandals and resignations in the cabinet.

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